Which supplements should a healthy person take?

I have recently been looking into which, if any, nutritional supplements I should start taking. I am in good general health so am looking for supplements that are likely to maintain or improve that health, not cure any particular condition. I have been using three excellent sources for this project, which I can recommend checking out: [1]

For those who want to save time, I will outline my key conclusions here in the hope that doing so will help you. I have decided to start taking:

  • Vitamin D3 (10µg or so a day)
  • Creatine (5g a day)
  • Zinc (30-160mg and Vitamin C (>1g)  each day for the duration of colds.

Tyrosine and potassium are also both cheap and so I will trial them to see if they improve my concentration. I don’t consider them likely to work, but they are at least worth testing. Fluoride mouthwashes also seem a cheap way to reduce the risk of cavities.

Vitamin D has a large evidence base suggesting it significantly lowers ‘all-cause mortality’ and improves both general and bone health. It is especially important now that I am living in the UK, where it is much harder to get Vitamin D from sun exposure.  It is also inexpensive. [2] Basically, it is a no-brainer. The 10µg is twice the daily recommended dietary dose in the UK. For some reason, Gwern is taking a very large 125µg each day. Personally I am tempted to err on the low side due to recent research suggesting too much Vitamin D can raise mortality.

Creatine is best known as a supplement for body-builders, but I am taking it primarily because I hope it will improve my cognition. The evidence to back this is thin, and only finds a significant effect among subgroups like vegetarians, perhaps because they get less creatine from meat consumption. However, the effect size identified was very large, it is cheap and largely safe. I am an almost-vegetarian and lift weights so it is more likely to be worthwhile for me. I will also be able test whether it improves my energy and concentration and stop using it if it doesn’t. This review also finds a range of other worthwhile positive impacts on health.

There is compelling evidence that zinc helps reduce the intensity and duration of colds. As summarised by Cochrane:

Zinc inhibits rhinoviral replication and has been tested in trials for treatment of the common cold. This review identified 15 randomized controlled trials, enrolling 1360 participants of all age groups, comparing zinc with placebo (no zinc). We found that zinc (lozenges or syrup) is beneficial in reducing the duration and severity of the common cold in healthy people, when taken within 24 hours of onset of symptoms.

There are some concerns about side effects, but they do not seem significant in the scheme of things. The tablets can also be obtained cheaply and easily. The appropriate dose is unclear, but studies included in the meta-analysis used between 30-160mg. I will probably choose a figure in the middle of that, and keep some tablets at work and home so I can always take them immediately at the onset of symptoms.

Despite a large number of studies, evidence to back an effect of Vitamin C on colds in the general population is mixed, with positive effects only reliably found on those engaging in extreme exercise. I worry that positive results on such sub-populations could just be the result of data mining, publication bias or other chicanery. Nonetheless, there are no side effects and the tablets are cheap. I consider it worth taking at the onset of colds, even if the probability of any real effect is under a third. Furthermore, effervescent vitamin C tablets are tasty and comforting to drink, and being as conspicuous as they are, may produce a larger than usual placebo effect.

Incidentally, most infection by common colds is caused by surface to surface contact. Using an ethanol handwash after touching shared surfaces, and reducing how often you touch your face with your hands, is likely to significantly reduce their occurrence. If you didn’t already have one, the desire not to get colds is a good selfish reason to wash your hands after using the bathroom. Poor general health is not the problem, as even healthy people who are exposed to the virus are highly likely to become infected.

If I were particularly worried about my blood pressure or cardiovascular health I would start

However, I am young, and consider heart disease to be a problem for the future.

I am keen to hear if I am making mistakes in the above, or missing out on other valuable chances to improve my life. Thanks to Seb Farquhar and Will Crouch for help with this research.

[1] Cochrane’s ‘house effect’ is to frequently find that there is insufficient evidence to draw any conclusion. Where they do make a recommendation, the evidence backing it is likely to be compelling. Gwern’s advice extends to unusual supplements about which there is little other information. Unfortunately, is in based in significant part on personal experiences. While he has tried to do blind and controlled trials  on himself with sufficient sample sizes, I don’t consider one individual’s experiences to be compelling evidence relative to large trials and meta-analyses. He often doesn’t have a statistically significant effect, in part due to small samples. Nonetheless, if the cost of a supplement is low, and it is safe, it can be worth taking even with a low probability of an effect. Snake-Oil Supplements falls somewhere in the middle.

[2] Reasonably cheap sources of: creatine, Vitamin D, Vitamin C and Zinc, tyrosine and potassium. Mouthwashes with over >200ppm of fluoride are widely available, but you should check the label.

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  • David Jinkins

    Thanks for the post!  A year or two ago I tried to determine which supplements were supported by research, and I had trouble sifting through the vast seas of pseudoscience.  Your links are very helpful.  

    Next write a post linking to hard evidence about whether climate change is human caused or not–this is another area that I find difficult to navigate as an educated layman.

    • http://www.gwern.net/ gwern

       Are you sure you want to bother? Learning about supplements at least has direct and immediate benefits (or harms…); while you can do nothing about global warming or climate changes and so the information has no direct utility.

      • http://juridicalcoherence.blogspot.com/ srdiamond

        Very enlightened attitude by gwern and 5 supporters: just ignore anything which you have no immediate control over!

      • http://www.gwern.net/ gwern

        So if one cares about the future possible large threats to humanity of a highly speculative and much criticized scientific phenomena called the Singularity, we’re dangerous wool-headed dreamers who are scamming and crying wolf, while caring about the similar scientific phenomenon called global warming is just good common sense and morally laudable? Whatever.

        Call me when there’s some strategy for dealing with global warming not as blatantly doomed or wasteful as emissions control.

      • http://juridicalcoherence.blogspot.com/ srdiamond

        So if one cares about the future possible large threats to humanity of a highly speculative and much criticized scientific phenomena called the Singularity, we’re dangerous wool-headed dreamers who are scamming and crying wolf, while caring about the similar scientific phenomenon called global warming is just good common sense and morally laudable?

        Substituting “highly speculative” (or otherwise poorly grounded) concerns is a commonly practiced method of avoiding real issues. It’s called the “Mrs. Jellyby” syndrome, for those who read fiction. (Dickens.) It manifests not only in supporting highly speculative charities to the detriment of real responsibilities, as with the fictitious Mrs. Jellyby, but in avoiding the politically controversial by substituting the scientifically unreasonable. Or–to avoid omitting anyone–by moaning about “animal rights” in a society where many people are treated as if they were the livestock.

      • Robert Wiblin

        Insofar as you are going to do something substantial with that knowledge if you get it, then it’s worth having. Otherwise it’s just satisfying your own curiosity.

        “Or–to avoid omitting anyone–by moaning about “animal rights” in a society where many people are treated as if they were the livestock.”

        The reason people choose to moan about animal rights is that they think it’s currently cheaper to prevent animal suffering than human suffering, not that they think humans don’t matter. They may be correct, though due to the importance of long run effects it’s hard to say.

    • Robert Wiblin

      I consider the likelihood of a human impact on temperatures to be over 80%. http://www.realclimate.org/ is fairly good on this topic.

    • Robert Easton
  • John Salvatier

    ‘Limiting my salt intake, though this unambiguous’ did you mean ‘this is ambiguous’? 

  • http://twitter.com/AlexeiSadeski Alexei Sadeski

    Didn’t read who wrote this post before I started reading it, and was a bit confused as to why Robin Hanson was living in the UK and lifting weights!

  • http://juridicalcoherence.blogspot.com/ srdiamond

    However I am young, and consider heart disease to be a problem for the future.

    You could extend your life expectancy by becoming less pessimistic.

  • http://www.gwern.net/ gwern

    >  For some reason, Gwern is taking a very large 125µg. I am tempted to err on the low side due to recent research suggesting too much Vitamin D can raise mortality.

    The mortality increase only applies to those hitting really high levels, >140nmol in your link. From looking at people’s self-reported blood reports online and my own particular circumstances, I would be surprised if I was hitting even 100nmol with my 5k IU supplements, and that’s comparable to many of the positive studies.

    > While he has tried to do blind and controlled trials  on himself with
    sufficient sample sizes, I don’t consider one individual’s experiences
    to be compelling evidence relative to large trials and meta-analyses.

    Indeed. I believe my ‘internal validity’ is often pretty good (I usually err on the side of making my stuff overpowered when possible), but the ‘external validity’ is going to be awful small.

    sp: ‘Reasonab’

    • Arepo

      ‘I usually err on the side of making my stuff overpowered when possible’

      Why?

      • http://www.gwern.net/ gwern

        Same reasons engineers build in redundancy to bridges and planes: if I ‘overpower’ a self-experiment, I have some margin of safety against making mistakes or just bad luck and some room for doing any post hoc analyses* – and Murphy’s law, there’s always some mistake or bit of bad luck!

        *

  • Robert Koslover

    Vitamin D is the new Vitamin C!

  • Robert Easton

    I am slightly surprised to see cost mentioned in each of these justifications. I thought of all vitamin supplements as being cheap enough that if you have decent evidence they do no harm, and some evidence they might help, you may as well take them. Maybe a waste of money but it’s a small waste of money. Are there any you would recommend independent of monetary cost but overall consider not worth it?

    What are you up to in our delightful (but grey skied) country?

    • Robert Wiblin

      Good point Robert. I haven’t yet encountered an expensive supplement but presumably there are some out there. Gwern lists modafnil as quite expensive ($200-300 a year).

      I am now Research Director at the Centre for Effective Altruism: http://centreforeffectivealtruism.org/ . Loving it, but not the grey skies! :)

    • http://www.gwern.net/ gwern

       > I thought of all vitamin supplements as being cheap enough that if you
      have decent evidence they do no harm, and some evidence they might help,
      you may as well take them.

      I don’t think that’s true. For starters, each supplement costs you money, of course, but they also cost you: time, effort, and mental space in justifying, regularly consuming, and restocking. Then there’s interactions; the number of possible combinations or interactions increases, well, combinatorially.

      As well, the money is nontrivial. Consider a supplement which costs $1 a day (less than half modafinil); that could easily be $18k over a lifetime. $1 a day is certainly vastly too high for vitamin D or melatonin, but it’s not so unreasonable if you’re talking 3 or 4 supplements or more, and then there’s the opportunity cost of that money as well. (One could analogize to cryonics: people are happy to perhaps commit to a lifetime of spending thousands of dollars on supplements that almost surely do nothing and even if they did didn’t do much, but refuse to even consider cryonics with a much more ‘clinically significant’ benefit and similar costs.)

  • Chris Gregory

    As someone with some background in nutrition (a couple of years of a BSc in human nutrition), I’d ignore almost all external advice about what people should or shouldn’t eat. There’s just too much variance and too little understanding. Genuinely, the best gauge for what you should eat is what your body tells you it wants…it’s impossible to avoid all outside stimuli, of course, and you’re reliant on what’s available to you, but on a happy note, we’re perfectly capable of maintaining ourselves on a huge variety of different things. Probably the only thing to avoid is limiting variety in your diet (unless it’s for religious reasons).

    Healthy and unhealthy foods are meaningless distinctions, and pretty much just code for social status. Health foods are status foods, and taking vitamin supplements is ritual magic unless you’ve got a medical condition or a severely inadequate diet.

    • Romeo Stevens

      This is what most people do and there is an obesity epidemic?
      Healthy and unhealthy aren’t meaningless distinctions it’s just that the terms have become horribly abused.  Nutrient dense foods are healthier than nutrient poor foods.

    • Robert Wiblin

      In general I agree we don’t know as much as it seems, which is why I’m not taking a large number of supplements. I don’t think the body can directly tell you everything you are missing though.

      Note vitamin D deficiency seems to be surprisingly common even in Australia: https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2002/177/3/vitamin-d-intake-and-vitamin-d-status-australians

    • AspiringRationalist

      For short term effects, that is true, although studies on the broader population can point out things likely worth investigating.
      For long-term effects, self-experimentation is not possible, so presumably it is best to make use of what information is there.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=599840205 Christian Kleineidam

      In our Western culture most people have no idea what their body tells them it “wants”. In principle that’s a good idea but I doubt that many people can put it into practice.

  • Pseu

    Is there any scientific support for fish oil supplements? Particularly for people who rarely eat fish?

    • Yosarian

       There is.  One suppliment,

    • Yosarian

       (Sorry, I’m new to this blog and I’m not sure how to delete or edit the unfinished comment).

      There is.  One fish oil suppliment has actually been approved by the FDA to reduce triglycerides, which should lower your chances of heart attacks.  

    • Romeo Stevens

      Smoked herring is cheap and tasty.

  • Eric_mcfaden41

    Try to get a prescription for potassium from your doc.  The amount you can get in over the counter supplement tablets is worthless.  

    • Ben

      Or just buy potassium citrate, which is sold as a food additive.

      • http://www.gwern.net/ gwern

         Yep, that’s quite easy. I had no problem getting some and it dissolves easily into water.

        (I should mention that for me, potassium citrate seems to cause severe sleep disturbances taken throughout the day and my current blinded & randomized experiment – taking it in the morning upon awakening – so far is going no better. I haven’t see anyone else report this effect.)

      • Guest

        Potassium chloride is commonly used as a salt substitute. See

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salt_substitute

        You may have some condition that impairs maintenance of potassium homoeostasis. Also, see

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperkalemia

      • http://www.gwern.net/ gwern

         I can’t rule that out, I suppose. It doesn’t sound very common, and the visible symptoms don’t sound like when I am using the potassium:

        > Symptoms are fairly nonspecific and generally include malaise, palpitations and muscle weakness; mild hyperventilation may indicate a compensatory response to metabolic acidosis, which is one of the possible causes of hyperkalemia.

      • Guest

        The point is, for you to have any symptoms at all from such potassium intake, blood potassium levels have to change, which suggests impaired elimination of potassium (Or something more bizarre – you being used to a diet that’s incredibly low in potassium?)

      • http://www.gwern.net/ gwern

         Or it could just be some new effect of potassium or potassium citrate in particular; it wouldn’t be the first time I experienced something affecting my sleep but not in the medical literature (vitamin D being a good example of another).

  • Romeo Stevens

    Magnesium deficiency is very common in the general populace and even more prevalent in people who lift weights AFAIK.  Magnesium citrate has about 30% bioavailability.  I take a small tablet in addition to making an effort to include ‘high’ dietary sources of magnesium in my daily diet.

    • http://www.facebook.com/william.alexander.eden William Eden

      It does seem like ancestral humans got most of their magnesium and calcium through the water supply, which we now filter out to a significant degree.

      The evidence behind calcium supplementation, particularly in combination with vitamin D, looks pretty strong – especially in the elderly. Personally I don’t yet supplement this (often) but perhaps I should consider it.

      For magnesium (and a host of other trace minerals), I personally add ConcenTrace to my water: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000AMUWLK/

    • Robert Wiblin

      Can you put up links to any useful papers on this topic?

  • dEMOCRATIC_cENTRALIST

    Is there any merit to taking a very broad supplement, based on the theory that it is likely you’re missing some trace nutrients? (These are actually rather expensive and involve consuming a couple of packets of pills a day.)

    • adrianratnapala

       I think the “apple a day” rule applies this principle.  Basically the idea is that it i better to ingest thousands of unknown organic compounds rather than a few.  And since we do that every time we eat any way, I guess it makes sense.

    • http://www.gwern.net/ gwern

       It’s appealing, yeah, but by definition a lot of trace nutrients won’t be in a ‘broad supplement’ (think of how many countless thousands of unknown constituents there are in an apple, while even a horse pill of a multivitamin will max out at a few hundred).

      And the big multivitamin studies haven’t been too encouraging; I compiled a few I’ve run into at http://www.gwern.net/Melatonin#fn44 but you can probably find more if you go looking.

  • Carlos

    Before one can decide what supplements to take, it’s necessary to know what nutrients are inadequately provide by the diet. Do you regularly eat nutrient dense foods? do you exercise (cardio, strength), get enough sun, sleep well, manage stress, etc? You can’t just take a random “study” without the context and then decide to take a pill of this or that. Track what you eat for a month, it’s easy with several online/mobile tools, see what you tend to be deficient in, then take into account that nutrients do not act in isolation (Vit. D3 and K2 help regulate the utilization of Calcium for example, Sodium can be a problem whether too low or when high in relation to Potassium, more O3 or rather less O6? etc.) Without a good understanding of your personal health status and context, deciding to take any supplement is like buying a lottery ticket. Sure it may result in a positive outcome but it’s kind of unlikely.

  • http://www.facebook.com/william.alexander.eden William Eden

    You should look into high-dose sublingual Vitamin B-12. It’s another very cheap, no-side-effects supplement that is surprisingly deficient in a large proportion of the population, even ones eating animal products.

    Here is a study looking largely at the older population: http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/89/2/693S.full

    Anecdotally, I am a mid-20s meat-eating male and still had marginal B-12 status, and this has been reported a number of times from the paleo community (which gets a lot of blood work done).

  • Scott H.

    1.)  I need to preface my statements by saying I eat large amounts of fruits and vegetables, but eat meat as well.  I only moderately try to limit fat intake.  Fruits and vegetables intake has the largest marginal increase on health of any dietary choice (for me).

    2.)  Given the prevalence of heart disease and the difficulty in diagnosing it, you might want to consider fish oil anyway.   Fish oil has other benefits as well.

    3.)  Vitamins rarely did anything for me.  I take vitamin D, but am considering cycling it during just the winter months.  I don’t notice vitamin D’s effects very much.  Vitamin C failed the “can I tell the difference” test long ago.

    4.)  CoQ10 seems to be a useful supplement as part of an larger effort to reduce body fat.

    5.)  HMB, while expensive is also a useful supplement for folks who workout and want better results (for strength and muscle mass as well as reduced body fat). 

    6.)  Green tea is a good supplement (taken at key times of the day) for body fat loss and concentration/energy over the course of the day.

    • Scott H.

       Also, I’m taking probiotics now, but haven’t noticed any difference.  I will probably stop them after this cycle. 

  • http://juridicalcoherence.blogspot.com/ srdiamond

    Gwern is taking a very large 125µg.

    Is citing gwern cronyism, or do you *really* think he’s to be taken seriously?

    What’s the scientific status of this health recommendation from his blog (http://www.gwern.net/On%20Stress):

    Similarly, it is not required of you that you dine at fine restaurants night and day – merely that you live in good health. A 50-lb bag of dog food will last you around 17 days (assuming you eat quite a bit every day); that, potable water (freely available), and a large multivitamin (around 100 days).

    • Robert Wiblin

      I think you misread the tone and purpose of that piece on stress.

    • Robert Wiblin

      It’s unlikely to be cronyism as I don’t even know Gwern. I noted his choice to prompt him to explain it as it is surprising and he has obviously researched this kind of thing a great deal.

    • http://www.gwern.net/ gwern

       What is optimal for performance is unlikely to be optimal for money; although I thank you for reading my site, if only to read it as uncharitably as possible.

      • http://juridicalcoherence.blogspot.com/ srdiamond

        I didn’t claim you said it was “optimal.” The point is only that you said it was healthful. And no one defending you is providing the scientific status for that bizarre claim.

      • http://www.gwern.net/ gwern

        What a strange demand.

        So, what, you think someone will sicken and die if they eat dog food? Do you think that is very plausible? Do you think that the occasional claims of people doing it are all lies? Do you really expect that this is something there will be solid scientific evidence on? (Why on earth would you expect such studies to exist in the first place?) Look at the ingredients for something like Purina dog show sometime; is it really so doubtful that eating stuff like soybean meal will *not* kill you? People can live pretty healthily on pretty poor diets.

      • http://juridicalcoherence.blogspot.com/ srdiamond

        Do you really expect that this is something there will be solid scientific evidence on?

        No, which is why I raised the point. Also, it’s why you shouldn’t have made the claim, at least not in the unqualified terms you did, particularly when in other places you treat yourself as an expert on the subject. 

        on the basis of all this, it seems to me more plausible than not that one can live on dog food adequately for long periods.

        You’re equivocating. You didn’t claim that it was your opinion that more likely than not you can live on dogfood. Who knows? It’s not regulated for human consumption.  You claimed that there’s no reason to stress out, even if you can live only on dog food, because it is perfectly healthful. 

        In essence, your position is tantamount to saying that it is all fine and well for the privileged to stress out about whether they should take exotic supplements, but the poor shouldn’t stress out, because there’s no definite evidence they’ll die if they eat dogfood.

        The importance of pursuing this is that you were quoted as someone with some credibility. 

        Readers can reach their own verdict about your ridiculous piece:
              http://www.gwern.net/On%20Stress

      • http://www.gwern.net/ gwern

        > No, which is why I raised the point.

        So you merely want every consideration based on impeccable evidence which will not usually exist.

        > You’re equivocating. You didn’t claim that it was your opinion that more likely than not you can live on dogfood.

        Really, equivocating? Where did I claim it was someone else’s opinion?

        > Because it’s not regulated for human consumption.

        Indeed, as OB shows every week, regulation is 100% necessary for safety and anything which is not regulated must be ultra-dangerous, while you can never die if it’s regulated.

        > You claimed that there’s no reason to stress out, even if you can live only on dog food, because it is perfectly healthful.

        Missing the point, and putting words into my mouth, respectively.

        > In essence, your position is tantamount to saying that it is all fine
        and well for the privileged to stress out about whether they should
        take exotic supplements, but the poor shouldn’t stress out, because
        there’s no definite evidence they’ll die if they eat dogfood.

        Yes. That is totally what I’m saying. I also hope the poor will die off quickly and decrease the surplus population, because otherwise, how will I get cheaper monocles and port wine?

        > Readers can reach their own verdict about your ridiculous piece:

        As in the previous thread where srdiamond claimed his homeschooling comments were a joke, I second the suggestion. It’s far from my best essay and I wouldn’t write it the same way today, but its faults are not what srdiamond claims.

      • guest

        Well, I would agree that people should stress less over wealth.

        Dog food is overpriced and not regulated for human consumption, though. Humans have far less acidic stomach and consequently bacterial contamination is a much larger issue. Bacterial toxins, too.

  • Nancy Lebovitz

    http://www.tedxblackrockcity.com/tedxtalks/the-legend-of-healthcare/

    Michael Vassar describes getting extensively tested to find out what he might be low on, which seems sensible.

  • Nupi

    I would add a decent Vitamin K2 supplement (for example, Life Extensions Super K)

  • Robert Wiblin

    Right but his point is just that this is possible in principle to live this way if you are poor, not that it is an optimal or healthy decision.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=599840205 Christian Kleineidam

    As far as Vitamin D goes, a bunch of people like Seth Roberts advocate to take it directly after awakening. 
    http://blog.sethroberts.net/2012/11/01/vitamin-d3-in-morning-improves-sleep-after-all-story-26/

    Even if there no strong scientific evidence for Seth’s claim it costs you nothing to take VItamin D in the morning.

    Additionally if the timing of vitamin D intake is as important as Seth suggests some of the reported problems of vitamin D overconsumption have to do with taking Vitamin D at the wrong time of the day.

  • KLS
  • Fred Burnaby

    I’ve converged on the exact same three supplements over time after hearing different things from random sources.

  • Spencer Greenberg

    I undertook a very similar project to Robert (evaluating the evidence on supplements) a few months prior, and even used two of the same sources that he used:
    http://www.highqualityevidence.org/and

    http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/play/snake-oil-supplements/

    It’s good to see that I came to similar conclusions as Robert. Upon finishing my research I had purchased zinc (for use against colds), vitamin D, and considered buying creatine.

    Vitamin D seems worth taking. Though I should point out that while the major Cochrane review on that subject:

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD007470.pub2/abstract

    found a VERY strong effect size:

    “Our analyses suggested that vitamin D3 reduces mortality by about 6%, which corresponds to 200 participants that need to be treated over a median of two years to save one additional life. ”

    the mean age in vitamin D studies (that the Cochrane reviewers were able to find in their search) was 74 years, and the mean proportion of women 79%. So unless you’re an older woman, it’s less than obvious how well the result will generalize for you.

  • http://www.yboris.com Boris

    There seems to be strong evidence that Omega-3 intake in healthy young adults can heighten working memory: http://biosingularity.com/2012/11/18/omega-3-intake-heightens-working-memory-in-healthy-young-adults/

    Project investigator said “Before seeing this data, I would have said it was impossible to move young healthy individuals above their cognitive best … We found that members of this population can enhance their working memory performance even further, despite their already being at the top of their cognitive game.”

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  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=632083295 ブラズウェル ジェイソン

    For what it’s worth, I just listed my personal regimen here:

    http://piyosplace.com/my-health-and-anti-aging-regimen/

    I don’t do much arguing on behalf of the supplements listed, but maybe there’s something there you haven’t considered.