Tag Archives: Book

On the Future by Rees

In his broad-reaching new book, On the Future, aging famous cosmologist Martin Rees says aging famous scientists too often overreach:

Scientists don’t improve with age—that they ‘burn out’. … There seem to be three destinies for us. First, and most common, is a diminishing focus on research. …

A second pathway, followed by some of the greatest scientists, is an unwise and overconfident diversification into other fields. Those who follow this route are still, in their own eyes, ‘doing science’—they want to understand the world and the cosmos, but they no longer get satisfaction from researching in the traditional piecemeal way: they over-reach themselves, sometimes to the embarrassment of their admirers. This syndrome has been aggravated by the tendency for the eminent and elderly to be shielded from criticism. …

But there is a third way—the most admirable. This is to continue to do what one is competent at, accepting that … one can probably at best aspire to be on a plateau rather than scaling new heights.

Rees says this in a book outside his initial areas of expertise, a book that has gained many high profile fawning uncritical reviews, a book wherein he whizzes past dozens of topics just long enough to state his opinion, but not long enough to offer detailed arguments or analysis in support. He seems oblivious to this parallel, though perhaps he’d argue that the future is not “science” and so doesn’t reward specialized study. As the author of a book that tries to show that careful detailed analysis of the future is quite possible and worthwhile, I of course disagree.

As I’m far from prestigious enough to get away a book like his, let me instead try to get away with a long probably ignored blog post wherein I take issue with many of Rees’ claims. While I of course also agree with much else, I’ll focus on disagreements. I’ll first discuss his factual claims, then his policy/value claims. Quotes are indented; my responses are not.  Continue reading "On the Future by Rees" »

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Age of Em Update

My first book, The Age of Em: Work, Love, and Life When Robots Rule the Earth, is moving along toward its June 1 publication date (in UK, a few weeks later in US). A full book jacket is now available:

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Blurbs are also now available, from: Sean Carroll, Marc Andreessen, David Brin, Andrew McAfee, Erik Brynjolfsson, Matt Ridley, Hal Varian, Tyler Cowen, Vernor Vinge, Steve Fuller, Bryan Caplan, Gregory Benford, Kevin Kelly, Ben Goertzel, Tim Harford, Geoffrey Miller, Tim O’Reilly, Scott Aaronson, Ramez Naam, Hannu Rajaniemi, William MacAskill, Eliezer Yudkowsky, Zach Weinersmith, Robert Freitas, Neil Jacobstein, Ralph Merkle, and Michael Chwe.

Kindle and Audible versions are in the works, as is a Chinese translation.

I have a page that lists all my talks on the book, many of which I’ll also post about here at this blog.

Abstracts for each of the thirty chapters should be available to see within a few weeks.

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Age of Em in Amsterdam

At 6pm on Tuesday, 24 November 2015, I’ll speak at Amsterdam University College on:

The Age of Em: Work, Love and Life when Robots Rule the Earth

Robots may one day rule the world, but what is a robot-ruled earth like? Many think the first truly smart robots will be brain emulations or ems. Scan a human brain, then run a model with the same connections on a fast computer and you have a robot brain, but recognisably human. Ems make us question common assumptions of moral progress because they reject many of the values we hold dear. Applying decades of expertise in physics, computer science and economics, Robin Hanson uses standard theories to paint a detailed picture of a world dominated by ems. (more)

The day before I’ll speak on the same subject at an invitation-only session of CIO Day. Added: I’ll also be on a panel on Enterprise Prediction Markets during the more open session on Tuesday.

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